Local band fosters musical growth

Denver Arts Week hosted dozens of local musicians; but a single band, North Side Travesty, used the surrounding excitement to celebrate opening the Rocky Mountain Sound Garden.

The Rocky Mountain Sound Garden, located in Centennial Park, will be a low-cost music studio for low-income and up-and-coming musicians in the Denver area. It was created by North Side Travesty in effort to provide a reliable and simple place for developing artists, such as themselves, to practice.

The opening took place Nov 9, during the Friday celebration of Denver Arts Week, and featured a performance by the band, other upcoming artists, food and festivities for patrons.

Lead singer, Philip James Sparer said that he was inspired to open the Sound Garden by his own band’s difficulties. According to him and lead guitarist, Dave Matejka, the band traveled significantly throughout Denver to find an affordable music studio.

Eventually they encountered an establishment just north of downtown with the instruments already plugged in and set up. This establishment inspired them to open a similar music studio closer to their home.

“All of us were just like; why would we not do this to support the local talent, support the things we love outside of our normal job, why would we not do that?” said Matejka.

Sparer said, “Rocky Mountain Sound Garden’s mission is to provide a safe, secure, and scenic space for musicians of all ages to come and practice.”

Downtown Cherry Creek, where many local artists performed or presented work in shops during Denver Arts Week, an annual celebration of the growing face of art, music and culture within Denver.

The studio is simple. It hosts a garage with a stage, lighting, and all appropriate stations for the equipment. Although small, the audience members said it reminds them of their local garage bands or musician friends.

“The genesis for the event space was to give another opportunity to translate what happens in the rehearsal studio onto a stage,” said Sparer

The building interior hosts two rehearsal studios and a recording studio, each hosting various instruments, microphones, and amps. The object was to provide young musicians the opportunity to promote themselves and enhance their abilities.

Sparer said, “Anything that anyone wants to do here, we want to facilitate it.”

The celebration of the opening lasted longer than expected. PB&Js provided unique snacks, and anytime the stage was free, freelance musicians or members of the audience would join in the fun. Already good friends sang and played themselves into the very hearts and minds of the participating audience.

Everybody jumped about the garage in drunken enthusiasm, letting the music ring across the adjacent lake and baseball field.

“We don’t want this to just be our little pet project which we enjoy,” continued Sparer, “but a community asset that can benefit as many people as want to be a part of it.”

“Denver is a growing music community but it is still a pretty small one.” He concluded

Denver Arts Week hosted dozens of local musicians; but a single band, North Side Travesty, used the surrounding excitement to celebrate opening the Rocky Mountain Sound Garden.

The Rocky Mountain Sound Garden, located in Centennial Park, will be a low-cost music studio for low-income and up-and-coming musicians in the Denver area. It was created by North Side Travesty in effort to provide a reliable and simple place for developing artists, such as themselves, to practice.

The opening took place Nov 9, during the Friday celebration of Denver Arts Week, and featured a performance by the band, other upcoming artists, food and festivities for patrons.

Lead singer, Philip James Sparer said that he was inspired to open the Sound Garden by his own band’s difficulties. According to him and lead guitarist, Dave Matejka, the band traveled significantly throughout Denver to find an affordable music studio.

Eventually they encountered an establishment just north of downtown with the instruments already plugged in and set up. This establishment inspired them to open a similar music studio closer to their home.

“All of us were just like; why would we not do this to support the local talent, support the things we love outside of our normal job, why would we not do that?” said Matejka.

Sparer said, “Rocky Mountain Sound Garden’s mission is to provide a safe, secure, and scenic space for musicians of all ages to come and practice.”

The studio is simple. It hosts a garage with a stage, lighting, and all appropriate stations for the equipment. Although small, the audience members said it reminds them of their local garage bands or musician friends.

“The genesis for the event space was to give another opportunity to translate what happens in the rehearsal studio onto a stage,” said Sparer

The building interior hosts two rehearsal studios and a recording studio, each hosting various instruments, microphones, and amps. The object was to provide young musicians the opportunity to promote themselves and enhance their abilities.

Sparer said, “Anything that anyone wants to do here, we want to facilitate it.”

Band member Dave Matejka dances with a patron as his band, North Side Travesty, performs at the opening of their new facilities for up and coming musicians, Rocky Mountain Sound Garden

The celebration of the opening lasted longer than expected. PB&Js provided unique snacks, and anytime the stage was free, freelance musicians or members of the audience would join in the fun. Already good friends sang and played themselves into the very hearts and minds of the participating audience.

Everybody jumped about the garage in drunken enthusiasm, letting the music ring across the adjacent lake and baseball field.

“We don’t want this to just be our little pet project which we enjoy,” continued Sparer, “but a community asset that can benefit as many people as want to be a part of it.”

“Denver is a growing music community but it is still a pretty small one.” He concluded

 

One Response to Local band fosters musical growth

  • Katy Owens
    Katy Owens says:

    You guys got some great b-roll in this! I loved the close-up shots of the musicians, and the variety in shots during the interviews was good too. It might have been better to not zoom in during the shot, but take separate shots close-up and farther away, but the variety was good. Cool to know about this!

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