Anna Walsh

Anna Walsh

DU takes back the tap

Anna Walsh

Savannah Christie

 

Take Back the Tap is a student run organization at the University of Denver that has been trying to make a name for itself since 2011. The organization is part of a national initiative to ban the sale of plastic water bottles on college campuses. Take Back the Tap is helping DU reduce their carbon foot print as well as become more environmentally conscientious. If DU bans the sale of plastic water bottles, it will show the public that DU is a pioneer of environmentally friendly college campuses, and how campaigns can be successfully established at other schools.

 

“Food & Water Watch is a non-profit which raises awareness about the issues that come along with bottled water on college campuses and in general and to promote clean, safe tap water,” says Erin Smith, campaign coordinator and DU senior.

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Behind the scenes of DU’s Theatre Department

Anna Walsh

Savannah Christie

 

For 8 weeks, the University of Denver Theater department has worked tirelessly to prefect their production of the musical, The Little Shop of Horrors. The show consists of over 50 cast and crewmembers, the majority of which are DU students.

“We spend about four hours at night a rehearsal,” says Thomas Lynch, a junior at DU and the lovesick lead, Seymour in Little Shop of Horrors. “It’s hard to balance school work with the show, especially as it gets closer to opening night.”

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Fighting waste, feeding people


The topic of my audio slideshow is the Food Recovery Network chapter at the University of Denver, started by junior Paul Sherman. The goal of my slideshow is to raise awareness for, and bring publicity to, DU’s chapter of FRN. In order to do this, I went along on a recovery mission and took corresponding photos of Paul and Zach getting the food, packing it into the car and delivering it to the Denver Rescue Mission. I spent time getting a lot of action shots and candid photos in order to express the movement and of the story and illustrate the work that goes into participating in a food recovery.

I aimed to get a variety of photos, and so I worked hard to feature as many aspects of the recovery that I could. What worked really well was the photos of Paul and Zach with the volunteer at the Denver Rescue Mission. The photographs that he is in depict his enthusiasm and gratefulness towards FRN, and the photos do well to liven up the slideshow. Other photos that worked well were the still shots that I took of Paul and Zach when first introducing them to the story.

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Students speaking out

This slideshow is showing that DU students do not always agree, and that is expected. More importantly, the slideshow is asking whether or not students feel comfortable speaking in class. Do students feel comfortable expressing their views in a classroom filled with students who may not agree and who may chastise them for speaking out and saying something ignorant or “stupid?”

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Controversy in the classroom

A lot of young men and women use their time in college to search, learn and grow. The classroom becomes a place to explore viewpoints, test opinions and create a dialogue among other students. This is the common notion of the college experience, but does the University of Denver do well to generate such an environment? Do students feel comfortable speaking freely in the classroom, or are the silenced by an atmosphere unwelcoming of candid conversation?

It’s about comfort

Raising a hand and speaking out in class can be difficult, especially on a controversial topic that may condemn the speaker or offend another student. Danny Brown, a junior and Media Studies major, is well known across campus for breaking boundaries and boldly expressing his opinions, no matter how contentious.

DU students don't always agree. The graffiti wall outside of Driscoll shows conflicting viewpoints existing side-by-side.

DU students don’t always agree. The graffiti wall outside of Driscoll shows conflicting viewpoints co-existing on campus.

“I do feel comfortable talking about controversial topics in the classroom,” said Brown. “I have, though, faced much backlash when it comes to this. Once during freshman year, I was in a communication class with about 50 people and the classroom was stadium style so there were a lot of people behind me. I tried to make a point, but due to people disagreeing with me, as well as not being able to make myself clear, about five people started yelling at me for being ignorant.”

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