Money

DU students petition for tuition “lock-in”

IMG_1132

DENVER- The University of Denver has quickly become one of the most expensive higher education institutions in the United States. In 2015 it was the 144th most expensive college/university in the country to attend and at the time tuition was only $56,077. For the 2017-2018 academic year total cost of attendance, as estimated by the Office of Financial Aid, will be $62,345.

A petition has been started by a student Alex Becht to have a 4-year tuition guarantee. While Alex was unavailable for comment the words on his petition paint a good picture of his cause, “college tuition rates rise an average of 3 percent per year, in comparison to the average income rising at only 0.4 percent per year. Mea Continue reading

Life after meal plans

For my audio slideshow I decided to focus on students and their eating habits, more specifically, DU students who live off campus.  The title of my slideshow is intended to give the viewer some insight as to what the video will address.  The goal of my slideshow is to make other students who live off campus aware of how their peers are going about college life without a meal plan.  The privilege of living off campus comes with many responsibilities that on-campus housing does not entail.   Continue reading

Experiences ≠ expenses: how DU students save with student discounts

My slideshow explores the many ways that college students can save money with student discounts. The article I wrote with regards to this topic largely dealt with the same topic, but at a national level. I tried to then give my slideshow a more local focus, dealing with savings students can find around the university and around the state. I chose to photograph establishments that offered student discounts, as well as students enjoying their savings. Money and budgeting can be a fairly uninteresting and bland subject, so I tried to have my photos make it a bit more interesting. I thought that if students could visualize what student discounts look like (i.e. horseback riding in Estes Park, watching a Colorado Rockies game), they would be more likely to seek out discounts in the future.

Continue reading

College luxuries on a budget: the secret world of student discounts

More power to your wallet: student discounts can make all the difference.

More power to your wallet: student discounts can make all the difference.

Today’s college students are acutely aware of rising tuition prices, but many are caught off guard by how much extra luxuries add up once they are no longer dependent on their parents’ bank accounts.

It is often said that college is less about education and more about experiences, however most experiences come with a price tag. Although the simple solution for college students to save money is to not spend any, this does not reflect reality.

“Yeah I’m trying to save money,” said second year University of Denver student Maddie Taylor. “But I still like to eat out, go to the movies, see shows, buy new clothes. Just because I’m in college doesn’t mean that I have to stop doing the things I enjoy!”

Taylor adds that this doesn’t mean she doesn’t still manage her money, but she often finds herself wanting to buy things she simply doesn’t have the money for. “I try [to make a budget], but I’m not very good at it,” said Taylor. Continue reading

DU students shop on a budget.

I wanted to highlight the different ways that college students shop on a budget, and the choices available to students looking for affordable options.  This includes tips from the students themselves, statistics provided by various sources, and brief mentions of some of the various retailers available to college students (plus ways to take advantage of discounts and rewards programs).

University of Students Reveal Their Secrets for Shopping on a Budget

In the past couple of years, global increases in the costs of raw materials and labor have caused a nearly 10 percent rise in clothing costs.  In response to higher costs, college students budgeting their money are looking for new, creative ways to buy quality clothing at a manageable price.

Many DU students have successfully learned to budget their money without sacrificing their personal style.  They have learned where to find the best deals, how to get the most value for their money, and what to look for while clothes shopping.

Student Lexi Dienstbier shows off a workout outfit she bought at Nordstrom Rack.

Student Lexi Dienstbier shows off a workout outfit she bought at Nordstrom Rack.

 

What to spend money on: quality vs. quantity.

While shopping for clothing, it seems tempting to measure success by quantity instead of quality.  However, for some students, the quality of the clothing is important for long-term and practical wear.

“I’d rather have one really good piece of clothing that would last awhile than many poor quality pieces,” said 19-year-old Lexi Dienstbier. Continue reading

Activists on campus tackle student debt

By Kaitlyn Griffith

On Thursday, a group of students from the Denver area met at the Sturm College of Law to discuss student autonomy in Colorado and the state of student loans nationwide.

The University of Denver, Regis University and the Iliff School of Theology were represented.

The red square was first seen in the Quebec student movement.  It originates from the students' demand that their government drop its plans to hike up tuition by 75%, a change which would have put students “squarely in the red” (i.e., in debt). Students in COSPA wear the squares to show solidarity with the Quebec student movement.

The red square was first seen in the Quebec student movement. It originates from the students’ demand that their government drop its plans to hike up tuition by 75%, a change which would have put students “squarely in the red” (i.e., in debt). Students in COSPA wear the squares to show solidarity with the Quebec student movement.

 

The students were members of the Colorado Student Power Alliance (COSPA), a group that seeks to eliminate student debt, democratize schools, reform curriculum and ensure open access to higher education for everyone who needs it.

 

“Students are financially constrained for something they should be allowed to do,” one student said.

To members of COSPA , education isn’t a privilege for the few, but a right of all.

Many issues discussed at the meeting hit close to home for many of the students present. Many fear what might happen if federal and state policy on student loans isn’t drastically altered.

“I don’t want to be my dad,” Elizabeth Borneman, a recent DU graduate, said. “He’s 50 and working in a job he hates.”

Students active in COSPA are aware of the potential pitfalls of trying to reform student loans. They understand that it will be an uphill battle, but many are determined to see this struggle through until the end.

Continue reading

Exploring the inner reality of Daniels College of Business ethics training

While gathering photos for my slideshow, I focused on human subjects whose energy would activate my presentation and infuse it with personality. The most challenging aspect of the photographic process revolves around the unexpectedness of capturing candid photos. I would find a perfect composition but just before I pressed the camera button, one person would move, and though I waited, poised at the ready, the composition would never return and I would be left empty-handed. Additionally, I struggled with finding the correct shooting settings on my camera. Continue reading

The danger of practicality: DU business students prepare for ethical dilemmas

Alma Limon, a DCB graduate with a double-major in Marketing and Communications

Alma Limon, a DCB graduate with a double-major in Marketing and Communications

They say money doesn’t buy happiness. But maybe it can provide a good down-payment.

After spending thousands of dollars on higher education, it seems the most practical thing for students to do is invest in self-preservation. And so, they choose a money-making major like business, regardless of how passionate they are about the subject. Students concerned with practicality are willing to endure years of dissatisfaction for a sizeable paycheck promising financial security for them and their loved ones. These students often formulate such plans: major in business, make as much money as soon as possible to pay back interest-accumulating loans, buy a house for a future family and build up a savings fund for aging parents. After fulfilling this string of heavy responsibilities, the students then return to college to pursue their true passion. Continue reading

College student spending habits: how money, food and parents may differ

DU students are spending money on living essentials, not items like electronics, which contrasts what other students are buying nationwide.

College students are spending more of their discretionary money on electronics than anything else, according to a 2009 study. However, DU students seem to be going against this trend, focusing their money more on food and tuition than anything else

According to WWD, a company that reports marketing trends, students were projected to spend $13 billion on electronics in 2009, which was more than double what they were to spend on clothes, $5.77 billion. Room and board expenses, which average about $600 and $180 per month, respectively, were so insignificant by comparison that they did not appear in reporting results.

Yet, University of Denver students seem to be spending more on food, rent and tuition than any other consideration. So exactly how much are DU students spending on these college necessities, and why aren’t they spending more on electronics?

Continue reading