Women’s March

Efficiency of public protests: Will students make a tangible change?

Hundreds gather for the Tax march on the Denver Capital.

Hundreds gather for the Tax march on the Denver Capital.

Since the historic election of Donald J. Trump protests have been ubiquitous and worldwide. Take for example the Women’s March which took place the day after Trump sworn into office, millions of people took to the streets in almost every major city in the United States. Even more renowned were the shocking photographs that captured the sheer mass of people participating in the march in places such as India, Serbia, Kenya and many more.

Across the country, airports such as John F. Kennedy and San Francisco International where filled to the brim with thousands of protesters – both standing in alliance with immigrants and against the Trumps temporary immigrant ban which prohibited people form the seven proclaimed Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States.

The famed No Dakota Access Pipeline protest, also known by its trendier name #noDAPL made waves as protesters flew into North Dakota from around the United States to partake. The protest which began in 2016 has been ongoing and in the media limelight even after the Trump administration has removed civilians from the land. Business Insider stated in Sep. 2016 that, “Whether or not the tribe is successful in stopping the pipeline, it is clear that the protest is reshaping the national conversation for any environmental project that would cross the Native American land.” Continue reading